Recycled software

Another way to avoid exploitation

Don’t pay for over-priced software that you don’t need!

This post is about how you can find a cheaper and more appropriate version of MS Office (which includes MS Word), if you really need it.

Recommended MS Office versions

  • MS Office Home and Student 2007 — possibly the best deal, but not common now. One license allows you to install on three devices.
  • MS Office 2010 Pro — widely used. For example, the current A5 flyers and A3 posters for the drop-in and podcast were edited with MS Word 2010 because that’s what I use to edit complex documents for commercial printing. MS Publisher 2010 is also very useful — and the last version of Publisher that can create documents in the CMYK format that commercial printers require.

More recent versions of MS Word are not superior, just more expensive.

How to buy a retail product key

This is how we got MS Office 2007 or 2010 on the drop-in laptops.

What you need to know about buying MS Office this way …

  • What you actually pay for is a licence key — a retail product that can be transferred and traded.
  • Always make sure that you are paying for a key, not a recurring subscription.
  • The software itself is a free download from the Microsoft server. Your retail licence key allows you to install and use the software legally — and you can move it to a new computer when you need to.
  • When you buy a retail licence key, the seller company provides full instructions on what to do with it.
  • By the way — if you have bought a Windows computer with MS Office pre-installed, you do not have a retail key. You cannot sell it or move it to a different computer.

Sellers

There are several UK sellers in this market. I’m not going to recommend any of them because you — as the buyer — must use your own judgement, not mine. I have been satisfied as a customer of Software Geeks (softwaregeeks.co.uk), but they have competitors and it might be foolish to ignore them.

Getting help

Although this procedure is quite straightforward, digital beginners can easily get lost. However, our drop-in volunteers can probably help you — provided you are already comfortable buying online with a credit or debit card.

If you are a Windows user, our volunteers might also point out that …

  • Open-source LibreOffice Writer (libreoffice.org/discover/writer) would probably meet all your word-processing requirements — and it’s free.
  • All versions of Windows since 1995 have included a simple word-processor named Wordpad — so if your needs are basic and you don’t need a spellchecker, you already have what you are looking for.

Understanding Dementia

Free online course for people who need a better understanding of dementia

Rick’s Hackney Dementia Week idea

I discovered this while I was searching for useful dementia resources on the web. It’s listed by Class Central in its Top 50 list, with 1415 favourable reviews. So I looked carefully at the course description and signed myself up.

The course is delivered by the University of Tasmania, and seems to be less demanding than a normal University course. It’s obviously aimed at a wider community, but people who do it get a certificate.

Community learning

It’s a relatively advanced course, but there are many drop-in contacts who could do it if they were able to commit three hours each week for seven weeks. People who are new to online learning might need support to navigate the system — but that is what we are here for. The IT Room desktops would be ideal for a small group of people willing to accept the challenge — community learning in practice — in my opinion, what the IT Room should be used for.

The course starts 10 July, so you don’t have to make a decision immediately. If your family is affected by dementia, this is worth looking at — even if only for a glimpse of the real Internet.

Click on the button below to visit the course web site. If you are not sure how to follow the enrolment procedure, please grab a helper.

Understanding Dementia course